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05 Nov 2020

"This document contains links to articles and/or press agency release from multiple open sources, agencies and academia. The contents, ideas or opinions in the document do not reflect NSD-S HUB or NATO views neither conform to the organization naming convention”

  

READING OF THE WEEK

How Europe Can Help Lebanon Overcome Its Economic Implosion

International Crisis Group

Lebanon’s post-war political order may have reached its limit as its economy implodes. Its elites have yet to chart a way out of a crisis that they created themselves over the years. Their failures have provoked popular, occasionally violent, protests that have continued despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Lebanon’s main donors, especially in Europe, are keen to see the country recover but, conscious of its poor record of instituting reforms, have attached strings to assistance beyond emergency humanitarian aid. Donors have told the government and ruling elites that they must first reach a deal with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and carry out reforms in accordance with past commitments. (…) The European Union and member states should stick to this line, agreeing to resume non-humanitarian assistance only once the Lebanese authorities launch genuine reforms that benefit the country as a whole, not just the privileged few.

 READ HERE


NORTH AFRICA / SAHEL / SUB – SAHARA

Improving youth livelihoods in the Ghana cocoa belt

ODI

This study uses a youth livelihood lens to assess the impacts of the MASO multifaceted five-year cocoa programmes, implemented in Ghana by a consortium of six partners led by Solidaridad West Africa and funded by the Mastercard Foundation. This programme was targeted at not-in-school youth aged 17–25 years-old living under the $2 per day poverty line in the following cocoa-growing regions of the country including: Afadzato South, Hohoe, Adanse South, Assin Foso, Bia West, Ho West, Kasapin and Sewfwi-Wiawso. Overall, the MASO programme targeted 10,700 youths across the country and had already trained 8,395 at the time of the writing.Lebanon’s post-war political order may have reached its limit as its economy implodes. Its elites have yet to chart a way out of a crisis that they created themselves over the years. Their failures have provoked popular, occasionally violent, protests that have continued despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Lebanon’s main donors, especially in Europe, are keen to see the country recover but, conscious of its poor record of instituting reforms, have attached strings to assistance beyond emergency humanitarian aid. Donors have told the government and ruling elites that they must first reach a deal with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and carry out reforms in accordance with past commitments. (…) The European Union and member states should stick to this line, agreeing to resume non-humanitarian assistance only once the Lebanese authorities launch genuine reforms that benefit the country as a whole, not just the privileged few.

READ HERE


Africa’s Infrastructure Finance

Policy Center -  Saudi Arabia 2020

Africa’s infrastructure investment gap has widened over time. Addressing the mismatch between developed countries’ “global savings glut” and African countries’ “investment dearth” might be a win-win. To facilitate that matching, some risk mitigation tools can be used. In this brief, we propose that by providing such risk mitigation tools, development institutions and governments can crowd-in private investment rather than crowd them out by providing full financing.

READ HERE

 


MIDDLE-EAST

Reviving Middle East and North Africa Regional Integration in the Post-COVID Era  (Fr)  (Ar)

World Bank Group

The combination of a Covid-19 pandemic and a collapse in oil prices has affected all aspects of the economies in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The region’s economies are projected to contract by 5.2 percent in 2020, which is 4.1 percentage points below the forecast in April 2020, and 7.8 percentage points worse than that of October 2019, reflecting an increasingly pessimistic outlook for the regional economy. The region is expected to recover only partially in 2021. Overall, leveraging regional integration to enable domestic reforms as a steppingstone to enhance global integration could become a new source of growth, jobs, and stability in the MENA region. To succeed, a new MENA trade integration framework would include different pillars.

READ HEREFRENCH
ARABIC

 

TRANSNATIONAL

 A COVID-19 Model to Inform Humanitarian Operations

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)

Despite the increasing number of models and studies on COVID-19, there is very little information available to inform humanitarian response interventions, the need for which may be unprecedented, particularly where infrastructure is lacking to effectively prevent spread of transmission and treat affected patients. In late 2019, the United Nations (UN) Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Centre for Humanitarian Data created a new workstream for predictive analytics. This was based on demand from OCHA’s leadership to “use data, and especially the tools of predictive analytics to get ahead, to be more anticipatory, to predict what is about to happen and to trigger the response earlier.” This ambition aligns with the overall goal of the Centre, which is to increase the use and impact of data in the humanitarian sector. 

READ HERE


Ammonia as a storage solution for future decarbonized energy systems

Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

This paper analyses whether ammonia can be viewed as an economically efficient and technologically suitable solution that can address the challenge of large-scale, long-duration, transportable energy storage in the decarbonized energy systems of the future. It compares all types of currently available energy storage techniques and shows that ammonia and hydrogen are the two most promising solutions that, apart from serving the objective of long-term storage in a low-carbon economy, could also be generated through a carbon-free process. The paper argues that ammonia, as an energy vector of hydrogen, is preferable to pure hydrogen from economic, environmental, and technological perspectives.

READ HERE


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